Case Studies Overview


Solving interesting challenges: The Cognisess platform has been used across the globe to provide answers to a broad range of issues faced by organisations. Learn about theirs, let us help solve yours!

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Case Studies Overview


Solving interesting challenges: The Cognisess platform has been used across the globe to provide answers to a broad range of issues faced by organisations. Learn about theirs, let us help solve yours!

Recruitment & Organisational Design challenge solved:

  • InterContinental Hotels Group - General Manager internal promotion, leadership succession - who and why?
  • Havas Media - There's much talk about innovation being vital for success, but what does innovation look like?
  • England RFU Rugby World Cup 2003 - With a particular focus on 'performance under pressure' define 'winning' cognitive attributes, define positional attributes, and create templates for future planning and selection.
  • Volkswagen - How do you achieve hiring consistency across dealerships and brands for 'difficult to fill customer facing roles?
  • MyOptique - How do we achieve hiring consistency and sourcing of candidates with 'best-fit' attributes?
  • Fonterra - What insights can we obtain into the link between emotion, cognition, personality and safe driving?

InterContinental Hotels Group (Europe)


Internal promotion, leadership succession - who and why?

Working with IHG we have been able to improve the processes whereby they recruit their General Managers 

InterContinental Hotels Group (Europe)


Internal promotion, leadership succession - who and why?

Working with IHG we have been able to improve the processes whereby they recruit their General Managers 

Volkswagen UK


How do you achieve hiring consistency across dealerships and brands for 'difficult to fill' customer facing roles?

Using the Cognisess platform Volkswagen have been able provide objectivity, consistency and reduce the cost of hire for customer-facing roles

Volkswagen UK


How do you achieve hiring consistency across dealerships and brands for 'difficult to fill' customer facing roles?

Using the Cognisess platform Volkswagen have been able provide objectivity, consistency and reduce the cost of hire for customer-facing roles

Havas Media - The Innovation project


Conducted with Havas Media, a leading digital media company. Seeking to understand if the desire to innovate; do things better and deliver more meaning is driven by core attributes such as personality, cognition and intelligence and/or by other values such as being curious and positive.

Havas Media - The Innovation project


Conducted with Havas Media, a leading digital media company. Seeking to understand if the desire to innovate; do things better and deliver more meaning is driven by core attributes such as personality, cognition and intelligence and/or by other values such as being curious and positive.

MyOptique


Case Study: Quality & Consistency in Recruitment

MyOptique


Case Study: Quality & Consistency in Recruitment

England RFU RWC 2003


Working with Sir Clive Woodward and his team of coaches and players, Cognisess (formerly known as MatchPower) developed a cognitive assessment programme to highlight players' cognitive performance under pressure.

England RFU RWC 2003


Working with Sir Clive Woodward and his team of coaches and players, Cognisess (formerly known as MatchPower) developed a cognitive assessment programme to highlight players' cognitive performance under pressure.

Cognisess Case Study: England RFU 2003 RWC Campaign

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TCUP - Thinking Clearly Under Pressure

Working with Sir Clive Woodward and his team of coaches and players, Cognisess (formerly known as MatchPower) developed a cognitive assessment programme to highlight players' cognitive performance under pressure.

‘TCUP’, or Think Clearly Under Pressure, was Woodward’s catch-all phrase that summed up a player’s ability to stay cool and do the right thing at the right moment. In short, knowing how to win. The dynamic assessment tool was used to profile the squad and identified strengths and weaknesses of each player and of groups of players – back and forwards. With a particular focus on performance under pressure, the Cognisess team created “winning” cognitive attributes, defined positional attributes, and created templates for succession planning and future selection.

“England have employed a company called MatchPower whose job it is to create specialised programmes for the players to test intelligence and to improve decision-making under pressure. Interestingly, some of the MatchPower team are from Israel. There must be quite a lot of thinking going on over there”.

Sir Clive Woodward writing in his book ‘Winning’!


The Brief

General Findings

During 2003, with a specially designed battery of online psycho-cognitive tests, the Cognisess Sport (formerly MatchPower) team assessed and analysed 43 pre-world cup England rugby training camp players and 10 coaching and management staff. Assessments covered broad psycho-cognitive areas associated with peak performance including; cognitive attributes, emotionality, attention and awareness, information processing and flexibility.

The brief set by Sir Clive Woodward, England’s Head Coach, and senior coaching staff, was to:

  • Determine whether there might be significant differentiating psycho-cognitive attributes relating to particular players or positional players.
     
  • Create benchmark templates going forward for screening, matching and succession planning intended to benefit the England Rugby Football Union.

It was understood by the coaching staff that the more of the cognitive performance we can measure, the better our ability to predict, coach and improve future potential. For England Rugby, Cognisess Sport provided cognitive assessment on the following areas:

1. Concentration: Measures how well you are able to centre your thoughts and concentrate on a task at hand without your mind wandering.

2. Orderliness: Looks at how ordered and systemized you are in the way you think about   things, which can have an effect on how you tend to structure your life.

3. Planning: Tests your ability to detect information by developing a logical and strategic search for solutions rapidly, accurately and effectively.

4. Creativity:  Examines your tendency towards being original, imaginative and resourceful in the way you think about things and how you plan responses and solutions to situations.

5. Focus: Measures your basic capacity to concentrate, to focus and sustain your attentional abilities.

6. Sensitivity to Trends: Measures how fast you can accurately respond to information illustrating an identifiable (developing) trend.

7. Stress Reactivity:  Measures how fast you can respond to information that is presented to you while retaining your accuracy which looks at your performance under pressure i.e. your ability to process information rapidly and accurately under stress.

8. Attentional style: This looks at how you adapt to different situations and your ability to shift between different ways of attending to things around you.

9. Short Term Memory: This measures your capacity to perceive and remember information, which is briefly displayed. It measures your capacity for the amount of information you can store and retrieve in short-term memory.

10. Distractibility: Depicts the degree to which you can resist or ignore different stimuli when you are focusing on a task. Your ability to resist distractions is crucial to concentration and paying attention. Generally this measure is a good predictor of performance in a wide variety of jobs or tasks requiring concentration and focus of attention.

11. Vigilance: Looks at how well you can maintain an accurate level of alertness, observation, and watchfulness in a sustained and concerted way.

12. Recognition & adaptation: Assesses your capacity to rapidly and accurately identify information and your cognitive flexibility i.e. the degree to which you can shift your ability to identify information when that information begins to change.

13. See the Larger Picture:  Provides an index of how well you can see the bigger picture and how well you are able to connect patterns of information in order to achieve this.

14. Thinking style:  Checks your capacity to think globally and in a constructive and adaptable way that adjusts easily to a variety of circumstances.

15. Visual sensitivity: Analyzes your capacity to extract relevant data from a complex field of extraneous information quickly and accurately, which generally acts as a good index on how well you are likely to process information

The assessment and profiling process proved to be discriminatory and predictive regarding the measurement of certain parameters. Individual player and trainer cognitive strengths and/or weaknesses were identified. There were statistically significant differences* between many individual players, positional groupings and even groups of players from different clubs; suggesting the existence of club cultures.  *unpublished report submitted to the RFU – January 2004".

Sample report feedback segments based on combined test findings relative to certain positional players:

1. All these attributes when combined, suggests that the players in these positions, are capable of playing individualistic, anticipatory, innovative, rugby.

They should be able to rapidly and accurately connect things, anticipate and respond to changing plays, by making quick decisions based on lightning reactions. This combination is especially effective.

2. When it comes to controlling the flow of the game, 75% of ‘x’ positional players quite clearly demonstrated excellent anticipatory skills. They also displayed a superior ability to recognize and interpret advance information. They also showed rapid decision making capabilities coupled with relatively quick simple reaction times. Moreover, their spatial awareness and the ability to identify the changing environment are good.

3. When all the players were researched in terms of their club/team origins, the majority of ‘x’ and ‘x’ club players seemed to display “under average” mean scores for their logical processing skills.

These players may share a fundamentally responsive “rugby instinct” on the field of play, rather than the more cool or calculating logical cognitive style.

Overall, the results of the assignment helped the RFU better understand some of the key cognitive attributes of senior players and foreshadowed guidelines for the profiling, identification and benchmarking of key psycho–cognitive attributes and performance measures for England Rugby going forward.

Summary
The establishment of key benchmark criteria as a means of screening and matching individuals to empirical templates found in the testing process will help provide a long-term framework for the recruiting of new and young players and staff so as to ensure consistency, reliability and flow of top class players.

Dr. Leonard Kristal, 2004

Fonterra - HGV Tanker Drivers


Using the objective data generated by the company's telematics systems and the Cognisess people analytics platform, it has been possible to provide data and insight into the link between emotion, cognition, personality and safe driving.

Fonterra - HGV Tanker Drivers


Using the objective data generated by the company's telematics systems and the Cognisess people analytics platform, it has been possible to provide data and insight into the link between emotion, cognition, personality and safe driving.

Cognisess Case Study - Attributes of Safe Drivers

The following case study was conducted with a global agricultural company headquartered in New Zealand. Using the objective data generated by the company's telematics systems and the Cognisess people analytics platform, it has been possible to provide data and insight into the link between emotion, cognition, personality and safe driving.

© Cognisess | All rights reserved

Subsequent to this case study, Cogmetrix has teamed with Mercurien BetterDriver to create the FleetRisk driver-behaviour risk-mitigation package. This means that organisations of all sizes, running fleets of all types of vehicles, can now implement a combined people analytics & telematics solution to reduce driver-behaviour risk and reduce operating costs in the process.

Visit the FleetRisk website for more information.


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY SLIDESHOW

FULL REPORT

By using Cognisess assessments to benchmark the organisation's fleet drivers, it has been possible to provide data and insight into the link between emotion, cognition, personality, and safe driving.

With prudent driving as the focus, the ‘quintessential’ driver can be better understood. This was achieved by merging telematic data* and the data obtained through Cognisess.

The findings identify key Cognisess and organisational driving attributes; this can be used to inform coaching, team selection and future talent ID.

A breakdown of the organisation's typical driver is provided along with the charactersitics and descriptors one would expect to find in a safe driver.

* Telematics is a method of monitoring a vehicle. By combining GPS with on-board diagnostics it is possible to record – and map – exactly where a car is and how fast it is traveling, and cross reference that with how a car is behaving internally.

 


KEY FINDINGS

In terms of personality, the organisation's typical driver is:

  • Down to earth
  • A straightforward thinker
  • Interested in the tangible world
  • Happy and energised alone
  • Independent and resilient
  • Team-oriented

This means they can focus on moving cargo quickly and efficiently without distractions. They can spend long periods of time alone and be contented throughout. They function best as being part of a team or fleet of drivers.

By considering drivers who encountered few incidences it was possible to identify the  typical safe driver at [organisation]. They usually:

  • Have an eye for detail and detect subtle differences
  • Are socially aware
  • Collaborative and reference others for ideas
  • Think actions through
  • Unflappable in situations
  • Take responsibility
  • Show persistence and diligence

This suggests they can detect subtle changes in the road and adjust their driving accordingly. They are aware of the movements and intentions of other drivers around them. If they encounter a tricky situation they will remain calm and take responsibility for their decisions.

Cognitively speaking, the organisation's drivers showed driving competencies that would be expected such a job type:

  • Attention and awareness – remember relevant information through focus and concentration.
  • Visual perception – perceive movements and patterns in visual field.
  • Adaptability and learning – change behaviour according to environment.

They did show less consideration for spatial orientation, which is a facet of visual perception. This was surprising as drivers might typically show competency in this area for skills such as manoeuvring the vehicle in tight spaces.

Drivers also did not require much ability in areas of short-term memory although working memory was useful, for example they may have to briefly remember order numbers before recording them for later.


DRIVER PROFILE

Based on the results, a [organisation] driver profile has been created where the typical driver is highlighted in two areas of personality but also a description of the ‘safe’ driver found in the cohort.

Table 1. Driver Personality Characteristics

Realist

  • Straightforward 

  • Practical

  • Reasonable

  • Rational

  • Traditional

Introvert

  • Team Player

  • Solitary

  • Thoughtful

  • Reserved

  • Serious

The findings show how the organisation's drivers compares to the normal person in relation to personality. Across social perception, conscientiousness, agreeableness, and emotional stability they are typical to the normal person however they do differ in openness and extraversion.

Regarding openness, this refers to their search for new and unfamiliar experiences. They are down to earth and straightforward thinkers. They are not so interested in theoretical and abstract thinking but more tangible relations in the world. As a driver they will focus on the task in hand whether this is to move cargo from A to B or to check the vehicle before a journey. Their mind will not wander and they will remain set on the protocol to follow.

With a low score in extraversion, this suggests that  the organisation's drivers are generally introverted. The measure relates to how much energy they get from interacting with the outside world. They may find that they get more energy from being alone than with other people. They are more team-orientated that natural leaders so they will thrive as part of a fleet of drivers. They can be on their own for long periods of time by maintaining and regulating their wellbeing and energy throughout. This is most useful for long-haul journeys.


Table 2. Safe Driver Characteristics

Attention & Awareness

  • Can locate target information

  • High focus and concentration

  • Divide attention well

  • Remember and organise information

Visual Perception

  • Coordinated between vision and movement

  • Good perception in the visual field

  • Can see the bigger picture

Adaptability & Learning

  • Not distracted by irrelevant information 

  • Impulsive control

  • Inhibition

The organisation's safe driver is typically competent across the areas of cognition listed in table 2. They are able to select and remember relevant information from detailed stimulus. They are able to concentrate on one task and block out distractions. This relates to their ability to look at things around them and recognize patterns in their driving environment.

They can divide their attention between things happening in and around the vehicle. Drivers can also suppress their responses to things happening around them in favour of the task in hand, such as continuing to drive and stay focused despite their phone continuously ringing.

Another competency of the safer driver is the ability to organise their thoughts to inform their actions. They can manage their time and prioritise tasks accordingly. They can also change their behaviour according to what is happening in their surroundings. This is also based on past experiences. As a driver this skillset is useful for moving around the road and transportation environments.


Table 3. Safe Driver Characteristics

Emotionally tuned

  • Empathic

  • Sensitive to others

  • Eye for detail

  • Aware of others

  • Interpersonal

Collaborative

  • Socially aware

  • Reference others for ideas

  • Influenced by opinion

  • Seek confirmation

  • Considerate

Conscientious

  • Organised

  • Diligent

  • Cautious

  • Ambitious

  • Vigilant

Having a high Emotional Intelligence (EI) has a relationship with encountering few driving incidences, in particular facial recognition and being able to read positive emotions. In addition, two areas of personality are correlated with safe driving. Being emotionally tuned means drivers are less likely to be involved with incidents or Class 2s. In particular, being able to recognise facial expressions and positive emotions. This suggests an emotional skill based on detecting subtle differences with an eye for detail.

Regarding personality, these drivers also show a high social perception. This means they have a high social awareness. They are collaborative and reference other people for ideas. In team situations they will be considerate of people around them and tap into their intentions to inform their own. This means that as a driver they may be aware of other drivers around them. This helps them make informed decisions on their manoeuvres, as they are able to relate to the movements of the other driver. They may be predicting or anticipating what is about to happen next.

Conscientiousness plays a key role in competent driving. This means that drivers will typically think their actions through before acting on impulse. This helps them avoid unnecessary stress or trouble on the road. They are well organised with their equipment. Their vehicle is always in check with the right gear and provisions. In addition, they are cautious with their movements and take keen responsibility in their duty as a driver. Diligence comes naturally, which may make them persistent in challenging situations such as driving on difficult terrains or unpredictable weather.


APPROACH

Sample
• 42 drivers took part in the study (male = 41 female = 1).
• 41 drivers were from New Zealand one from Australia.
• The average age was 44. There was a range of 40 years with the youngest driver being 24 and the oldest 64.

At this point, attention should be given to sample size and variation in the data. Sample size is fairly small for comparison so it would be of interest to revisit unexpected findings such as those in spatial orientation but with a larger cohort. Furthermore, the variation in incidents recorded was small over the two months provided. This is indeed good news for safe driving but for analysis purposes some interpretation is required of the results.

METHOD

All drivers took the Cognisess battery measuring talent across emotional intelligence, cognitive function, and personality.

Telematic data was also used relating to fleet drivers where recordings of interest were:
• Incidents
• Class 2

Safe driver – A construct devised to refer to a fleet driver who is not encountering incidents and class 2s
throughout their career.

ANALYSIS

Relationships were explored between the four areas of talent measured by Cognisess (emotion, cognition, personality, wellbeing) and the telematic data available. Test of difference between existing cohorts in the Cognisess population were also considered. Tests used were as follows:

Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient - An inferential statistical test of correlation used to analyse non- parametric data. It measures the extent to which to variables are related to each other.

Independent Samples Mann-Whitney U Test - An inferential statistical test used to analyse nonparametric data from two-sample independent groups designs. It looks for significant differences between groups that do not occur by chance.


RESULTS

Following Independent Samples Mann-Whitney U Test, significant differences were found between [organisation] drivers and their Cognisess Population age group (age range 24-64, n=938). They scored significantly lower in Openness (U = 3.65, n1 = 28 n2 = 938, p < .001, two-tailed), Extraversion (U = 2.23, n1 = 28 n2 = 938, p = .026, two-tailed), and spatial orientation (U = 2.23, n1 = 30 n2 = 1064, p = .005, two-tailed) than the comparison group.

Table 1 reports results following Spearman’s rank correlation coefficient. The target variable was an aggregate of Incidents and Class 2 recordings of Harsh Cornering and Braking in August and September. High scores indicate high occurrences of the aggregate group. The variable was correlated against all Cognisess attributes where high scores indicate ability in these areas.

Table 4. Correlations with Target Variables

                                                     EQ        Emotion Test      Facial Recognition     Positive Emotions         Social Perception      Conscientiousness

Incidents and Class 2            -.436**           -.373*                       -.375*                           -.435**                             -.605**                        -.576**

**p < .001 (two-tailed), * p < .05 (two-tailed)


SUMMARY

In general terms, the organisation's fleet driver is a realist and likes to think on practical terms. They can be team players when required but crucially they are happy and energised on their own. They also show strong attention and awareness, visual perception, and adaptability and learning. Though they may show less of a need for areas of short-term memory.

Safe drivers in particular will have good interpersonal skills and be emotionally tuned to others. They are collaborative and considerate. Furthermore, it is in their nature to be highly organised and cautious of their movements.

The data provide useful guidelines for better understanding the nature of drivers at the organisation. Due to sample size, it would be beneficial to revisit the results of some assessments and with telematic data across more months. Core characteristics can be interpreted positively by using them as support for on-going training or dealing with barriers in a driver’s career.

Finally, the driver descriptors can be used to driver strengths and weaknesses and where they may function best in a driving fleet.


APPENDIX

Spearman's rank correlation coefficient